How to Litter Train a Kitten: Litter Training a Cat

How to Litter Train a Kitten: Litter Training a Cat

Hi.
I'm Caitlin Lewis, community outreach manager for the Humane Society of
Greater Dayton.
Today, we're going to learn how to train, or retrain, your cat to use the
litter box.
Contrary to popular belief, mother cats do not teach their kittens to use
the litter box.
Kittens begin to dig in and use dirt and dry loose material at just a few
weeks old without ever having observed their mothers doing so.
This natural instinct is used in training kittens to
use the litter box.
Until your cat is reliably house trained, she should not have free run
of your home.
When you leave the house for any length of time, your cat should be
confined to a single room, preferably one with non-porous floors, such as
the kitchen, bathroom, utility room, basement, or garage.
Provide your cat with a bowl of water and a warm place to sleep at one end
of the room and a freshly clean litter box at the other end.
Until the house soiling has been cured, your cat should have a regular
feeding schedule so she will develop a corresponding litter box schedule.
In order to reward your cat for using her litter box, you must be there at
the time she uses it.
Most cats, especially kittens, will need to go shortly after waking, after
eating, and after exercise.
To help predict when your cat will go, feed her at regular times.
If the input is on a regular schedule, the output will follow likewise.
Call her to the litter box from a variety of places around your house,
especially areas where she has soiled.
When your cat gets to the box, scratch the litter to get her interested.
Similarly, throughout the day, whenever your cat has been asleep for
over two hours, wake her up and call her to the litter box.
Encourage your cat to hop into the litter box and praise her
when she does so.
Even if she does not go, she's learning that the litter box is a
great, clean place to be.
If your cat does use it, then praise her in a gentle voice.
Once she is finished, gently stroke her, give her a treat, and let her
know how pleased you are with her behavior.
If mistakes occur, pick up the cat and set her down in the box.
Do not discipline just before placing the cat in the box.
The cat will associate any reprimand with being placed in the litter box
and will assume the litter box is the wrong place to go.
Punishing a cat after the fact teaches her to be afraid of you.
Never rub your cat's nose in a mess or bring her over to it for a reprimand.
She will have no idea why she's being reprimand, but she may be inclined to
eliminate in hidden spots, such as behind the sofa, to
avoid another reprimand.
Basically, punishment doesn't work with cats.
Prevention and praise for getting it right are the keys to training.
Clean any accidents immediately with half and half solution of white
vinegar and water.
This will help to eliminate the odor and hopefully prevent kitty from
returning to that spot.
Consider covering the area with a plastic sheet.
This will make it unpleasant for your kitty and discourage her from going
there again.
When your cat is still learning to use the box, leave a tiny bit of urine or
feces behind in the box.
The scent will remind her what the box is for.
As soon as she is using the box reliably, and this could be as quickly
as a day or two, remove all liquid and solid waste regularly.
Scoop out solid material once or twice a day and stir the litter to keep the
surface dry.
If your cat is having trouble using or finding the litter box, move it to an
area where she can start seeing it all the time.
When she stops playing and starts sniffing or scratching at the floor,
gently place her in the litter box.
If your cat or kitten suddenly stops using the litter box for no obvious
reasons, then take your cat to the veterinarian as soon as possible.
Once your cat gets into the hang of finding the litter box and using it,
they should have this skill for life.
Now let's recap.
Provide your cat with a clean litter box that's easy to access.
Get her interested in the litter box by scratching the litter.
Reward your cat for using her litter box immediately after she uses it.
And remember, prevention and praise are the keys to training.
Punishment does not work with cats.
On behalf of Iams, I'm Caitlin Lewis for Howdini.
For more information and offers, check out the website.
If you liked this video, please hit the Like button.
To find out when we have more videos available, to be sure to subscribe.
Have some good ideas or tips for teaching your cat to
use the litter box?
Be sure and let us know in the comments section below.

CLICKER TRAINING (CAT) TUTORIAL – BEGINNER

CLICKER TRAINING (CAT) TUTORIAL – BEGINNER

I’ve “clicker trained” animals for more than 29 years. My cat Didga and I will teach you how to “charge” the clicker. From there you can teach your cat all sorts of things. Thanks for subscribing and sharing my videos.
Other videos (tutorials) from CATMANTOO –
Viral video – Cat Barely Escapes Jaws –
Teach your cat to walk on leash –
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Cat Toilet Training Step by Step

Cat Toilet Training Step by Step

This real-life sequence of cat toilet training by Kat Trainer, PhD. shows you how to train your cat to use a human toilet. Most people fail at one step while the cat just refuses to move forward. Watch how to overcome this with the “Transition Strategy”, which would enable your cat to easily move to the next step. You wonder why I am successful; it is because I used cat psychology and teaching methodologies as a professor with a PhD.

How to Train a Cat to Come When Called | Cat Care

How to Train a Cat to Come When Called | Cat Care

Great Amazon Must Haves for any Cat Owner:

Feline GREENIES Dental Treats for Cats:
Four Paws Magic Coat Love Glove Cat Grooming Mitt:
Bergan Star Chaser Turbo Scratcher Cat Toy:
IRIS Open Top Litter Box with Shield and Scoop:
Watch more How to Take Care of a Cat videos:

Many people think that you can’t train a cat. Well, they’re wrong. If you know what motivates your cat, you can train it. Now, training with Fria today is going to be a little difficult because she’s pretty snooty, but I’m just going to see if she has a reaction to her favorite treat bag. That can be a great place to start for coming when called.

Many cats know the sound of their treat bag and get excited right off the bat when they hear it. So, let’s just see if she wakes up. Oh, suddenly we’re interested. Well, it’s not an ideal time to practice coming when called. It is a good time to reinforce the association that hearing the treat bag means good things.

Now, many cat owners already know about the treat bag effect, but what they don’t know is that it’s really easy to capitalize on it to teach your cat to come when called. The way to do that is to pair your cat’s name with a treat. The great news is since your cat knows the sound of a treat bag or a treat canister, you can build on an already strong association.

So, in this case, you might say your cat’s name and then give them a treat. So, I’ll go like this. Fria and then I crinkle the bag which means a treat is coming and then I give her one. Now first, when you’re starting this you want to start right by your cat because they don’t really know what you’re trying to do. Start at a place where cat and you are most likely to be successful. So, rinse and repeat. Fria, crinkle, crinkle and then give a treat.

Now, when you’re ready to start working on coming when called you can begin working from a distance. I’m not going to do this with Fria today because she might walk right off the table if she happened to get up, but what you would do is the same type of behavior. Say the cat’s name, crinkle the bag and as soon as they come over give a treat. Eventually, the name that you give your cat for this exercise will become as powerful as the treat bag and you’ll see that when you give the sound of your cat’s name that your cat comes running for that treat.

Over time you can stop using food and use scratches or other positive attention that your cat enjoys as a reinforcer. Just remember that it’s not normal for cats to come when called in the wild, so it’s definitely a behavior that’s worth paying for. That’s how you teach your cat to come when called.

The Best and Worst Ways to Train Your Cat

The Best and Worst Ways to Train Your Cat

Dear people of Team Cat Mojo.
This is a public service announcement.
My name is squirt, squirt bottle.
You may use me to remain stains.
You may use me to water your garden.
What you should not use me for, and what
has upset many of my brethren, is to punish your animals.
Welcome to the Cat Cave.

Alright, it's time we talked about squirt gun diplomacy.
If I can't use this, how do I discipline my cat?
No such thing as disciplining your cat.
I'm sorry to say folks, they have no idea
what you're talking about when you use this voice on them.
Squirt guns do not work.
They do not work.
Now let's use an example.
Let's say your cat is counter surfing.
Counter surfing of course means that they're just
walking across the counters, and it's
something that drives you insane.
And you would much rather that your cats aren't counter
surfing.
If you wanted your cat to stop counter surfing,
then every single time, 24/7, that they jump up
on the counter– if you wanted to be hanging out
with Mr. squirt bottle, and you wanted
make sure that they got off the counter, when then you've
got to camp out there, all day, every day.
Then when you're not around, I promise you
your cat is counter surfing.
I promise that you haven't taught them a thing.
All they know is that when you're around,
they shouldn't do something.
And when you're not around, they will.
So you have succeeded in diminishing
the bond between you and your cat completely.
They are afraid of you, not afraid of the experience
of getting wet when they jump up on the counter.
So it's something that I find really, really important,
because it follows that line of thinking.
Can cats be disciplined?
No, of course they cannot.
What let's say that we were using
an air-compressed canister and an electric eye, that tool.
Put down, cat jumps up, squirt squirt, OK, with air.
And they're gone.
What's the big difference there?
That you didn't do it, the counter did it.
That's an effective no.
What can you do if there's something
that you would rather your cat not do?
Well you've got to make it work for them.
So counter surfing– first of all, what does it attain?
Are you keeping food on the counter
and then asking your cat not to eat that food?
Is your cat a big fan of running water out of a faucet, and yet
there is no running water in the form of fountains
any place else?
Or is your cat thriving on potentially negative attention?
It doesn't really matter.
If you yell at your cat or praise your cat–
it's attention, right?
So if every time I jump up on the counter,
I get attention, negative or positive,
short of striking or squirting or whatever, then I'll
probably keep doing it.
If absolutely nothing happens when
I jump up on the counter– no food, no reward, no lovey
dovey, no pick you up and put you
down, no pet on the way down, no yelling your name, no nothing.
Nothing happens.
Then why would I continue to do it?
OK so now we get to the second part of this.
Squirt guns are out.
So now we get to what I call the yes no.
It doesn't matter whether you're parenting someone
with for legs or two.
The yes no is a great way of doing things.
Let's go back to our counter surfer friend
who, every time you're in the kitchen, has to be out there.
We can do something very simple.
For instance, use a placement.
The placemat has double-sided sticky tape on it,
which is a really cool little trick, because you can take it
off, put away somewhere, put it back down, it's sticky.
Every time you cat jumps up on the counter– sticky, sticky.
Eh, I got to go.
Or you use the compressed air canisters
with the electric eyes that I use, like StayAway or Scat,
any of those guys.
They go.
We just established the no.
Now where's the yes?
Well the yes for a tree-dwelling, inquisitive,
counter surfer is something up in that kitchen that
rises to the height, approximately, of that counter.
Now away from the counter, so we're
not asking them to jump up on the counter, get sticky paws,
get frustrated, go down, and do whatever they do.
But for them to have a sill, a stand, a tree in the kitchen
area so while you're making dinner, they can observe.
Yeah.
I approve, right?
My name is Fluffy and I approve this dinner.
Then we're good.
So the moral of the story here is
that if you want your cat to do something,
you've got to meet them halfway.
Compromise is one of the highest forms
of love in a relationship.
This actually signifies something completely different,
on a deeper level.
This signifies that we believe that we
can bend our animals to our will, right?
And if we step back from the squirt gun for a second,
step away from the squirt gun, we
may realize that that is not a humane operational system.
Squirt gun diplomacy is not actual diplomacy.
In essence, think about the no and yes.
And once you think about no and yes, you'll
probably get somewhere, alright?
So anyhow.
That's all I got for today.
Keep watching.
Guys, thank you so much for subscribing.
We passed 20,000 subscribers on the Cat Mojo channel,
and I could not be more proud and grateful.
And grateful to the folks at the Animalist Network, by the way,
for helping so much and making this a reality.
So check me out here.
Anywhere you are, I am.
I don't care if it's Twitter or Facebook or Instagram
or YouTube or Google.
Or probably in the supermarket.
We're in the same place at the same time.
And I would love to hear from you.
Please leave a comment.
Please keep subscribing.
Don't forget, we just had our second Google Hangout.
We'll be having Mojo Hangouts onward and onward every month,
so you'll find out about that by subscribing as well.
In the meantime, be kind to all.
We all deserve a break.
Until next time.
All light, all love, all mojo to ya, baby.
Ahh, love ya. [MUSIC] You're a bad cat.
I'm not a bad cat.
You're a bad cat.
I'm not a bad cat.
You're a bad cat.
I'm just misunderstood.
Meow.

Cat training: Marie learns basic commands

Cat training: Marie learns basic commands

Our teacup Himalayan kitten, Marie, has finally fully recovered from hernia repair surgery, so it was time for some basic training. Marie is quite sharp, picking up the commands within a couple of training sessions. Here, she “comes here,” “sits,” “shakes right/left hand,” and “gluteus” for treats and petting rewards.

Check out our other videos for more entertainment, and remember to subscribe. If you liked this, also check out our pet blog at for stories and pictures.